Technology training opens doors to a better life

A program to teach young people about microchip applications and computer programming is helping underprivileged children in India find a pathway to a better life.

A program to teach young people about microchip applications and computer programming is helping underprivileged children in India find a pathway to a better life.

STEMSEL is a not for profit organisation based in Adelaide, South Australia, that aims to teach every child how to use electronics.

STEMSEL Director for India David RIchards has helped bring the organisation's computer programming kit to schools and orphanages in India in an attempt to help educate India's youth.

"I began by employing 10 engineers and managers in India while studying at the University of South Australia,” he said.

"We provide free training for underprivileged students to use our patented software to learn how to invent new things and develop their own start-up businesses."

STEMSEL is an acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths and Social Enterprise Learning.

It has formed relationships with educational institutions across India and also maintains strong connections with orphanages and children's homes.

The STEMSEL Foundation was started in Adelaide 21 years ago by Peng Choo, who believed his vision for the company would transcend into economic benefits that would one day change the world.

"The whole process is to empower people who may one day use the technologies they develop to battle climate change, greenhouse gases, and even advancements in automotive engineering," Choo said.