Orthocell granted patents for medical device manufacture

Photo: Orthocell

Local regenerative medicine company Orthocell has been granted patents in Canada and Japan for the manufacture of its customisable medical device, produced in its quality-controlled facility in WA.

The patents cover Orthocell’s CelGro technology, a collagen medical device which facilitates tissue repair and healing in a variety of orthopaedic, reconstructive and surgical applications.

CelGro has numerous competitive advantages over existing synthetic and biologic tissue repair devices, particularly in the areas of cell compatibility, tensile strength and the promotion of quality tissue in growth and repair.

In clinical studies, CelGro has shown to augment repair of severed, or damaged peripheral nerves, the rotator cuff tendon within the shoulder and guide bone regeneration within the jaw.

The company believes CelGro represents a breakthrough in soft tissue reconstruction and offers significant global commercial potential in its existing addressable markets as well as much wider applications in general surgical and soft tissue reconstructive applications. The company estimates the global addressable market for CelGro is in excess of $6.5 billion and growing.

“In line with our IP strategy, we are focused on establishing and maintaining protection of our leading manufacturing technologies and treatment processes. Securing a divisional patent for CelGro in Canada and Japan is another milestone in strengthening our IP position in global markets,” Orthocell managing director, Paul Anderson, said.

This complements the progression of our products through the registration processes in the US, EU and Australia.”

Orthocell has secured 11 patent families covering its portfolio of breakthrough regenerative medicine products, comprising 108 separate patent applications, of which 78 are granted.