Jobs go at auto components manufacturers

Workers at ACL Bearing in Tasmania and APV Automotive Components in Melbourne will be losing their jobs within weeks.

Workers at ACL Bearing in Tasmania and APV Automotive Components in Melbourne will be losing their jobs within weeks.

Both ACL and APV, which entered receivership in 2009 and April this year respectively, have told their workers that jobs will be cut, according to the ABC.

When ACL initially went into receivership the business cut 110 workers.

Earlier this week they announced another 20 workers will be laid off within the coming weeks.

Workers were up in arms over the announcement, which the Australian Manufacturing Workers' Union says was dropped on them without warning.

"We were discussing normal workplace issues and they said 'oh by the way, we're going to make another 20 people redundant'," AMWU spokesperson John Short said.

The company explained that it has been struggling to compete in Tasmania, adding that "the problem now is that the manufacturers have to go through Melbourne and there's costs associated with that".

These latest redundancies leave only 125 workers at the plant.

Across the strait in Melbourne, around 90 workers will lose their jobs at APV from 31 August.

Dave Smith from the AMWU said more needs to be done to help the automotive industry, especially after it was reported that Ford may be leaving Australia by 2016.

"The vehicle industry is doing it very tough at the moment but there are some things that can be done to support the industry, procurements is one at a federal and state level," Smith said.

He went on to say that these workers will have difficulty finding another job, particularly in the automotive industry.

We'll put in a lot of support for them to help them transition, many of them will need to move into other industries.

"I know a lot of them will want to stay in the automotive industry, but we'll be doing everything we can to make sure their skills are recognised."

These latest cuts come as Indian car makers post high sales figures.

 

Image: ABC