Biomedical engineering school opens at USYD

The University of Sydney has launched the School of Biomedical Engineering, the sixth school within the Faculty of Engineering.

The new school will focus on collaboration and teaching within the field of biomedical engineering, with contributions from disciplines including medicine, engineering, and life sciences.

Leading the school will be professor Gregg Suaning, who hopes that Australia will have a growing role to play in the development of medical technology and medicines.

“Australia is at the forefront of biomedical engineering and it’s essential that we invest in research and technology that will lead us to a new generation of medical therapies and cures,” said Suaning.

Suaning’s previous research has worked towards producing a bionic eye for the blind. Such work will be characteristic of the new school, which will seek to find new ways of treating disease.

“The new School’s aim is to improve health outcomes by targeting diseases that currently do not have cures. We will achieve this through innovative biotechnologies focused on tissue and neural engineering, nanomaterials and by introducing novel approaches to overcome chronic disease,” said Suaning.

A number of custom built laboratories will support the work of the school as dean of engineering, Professor Willy Zwaenepoel noted, including the Industrial Transformation Training Centre for Innovative Bioengineering, a new Bio-Engineering Research hub, and the Sydney Bionics Translation Centre.

“Our purpose-built research facilities will help enable the School of Biomedical Engineering to take medical devices from the concept stage through to the clinic and beyond,” said Zwaenepoel.

At the launch of the school, University of Washington bioengineering academic, Professor Matthew O’Donnell, highlighted that biomedical draws together industry and academia in new and important ways.

“Biomedical engineering has developed into a core discipline for modern engineering. The University of Sydney has recognised this fact and moved quickly to establish a School of Biomedical Engineering that has the potential to accelerate technical innovations in healthcare and significantly impact the field for generations,” he said.