Automation company now offers ‘jogging’ licences

ABB, global power and automation technology group announced that it is introducing a new robotics training course.

ABB, global power and automation technology group announced that it is introducing a new robotics training course.

With Operator Safety being a top priority, the company’s one day robotics training course called the ‘Jogging Licence’ is designed to satisfy the training needs of Australian manufacturers.

The objective of the new course is for production personnel to develop an understanding of basic robot safety and the safe operation of the company’s robot controller systems.

“With manufacturers answering the call to improve their productivity by adopting automation technology, there is an increasing number of people working in production facilities that contain robotic equipment” explained Greg Sale, ABB Robotics Service Sales.

“And whilst personnel do not need to go inside the protective barriers of a robotic cell on a regular basis, when the need does arise – it is important that people understand how to do so safely.”

“The new ‘Jogging License’ course will equip people with the robotics safety awareness, knowledge and instruction required.”

The training will cover Introduction to the robot, documentation, presentation of the S4 or IRC5 robot system, manual operation of the robot, jogging window, input/output window, coordination of systems, TCP0, hands-on practice (system start up procedure etc.), introduction to quick teach, programming window inst/test, system errors, log files as well as practical demonstrations.

The course is carried out at the company’s dedicated training facility in Melbourne or can be arranged on-site for minimum numbers, if requested.

The company says its instructors are all experienced in the automation business — many promoted from Field Operation activities where they have been trained and experienced “the real world”.

As a result, the training provided is practical and specifically developed to mirror production situations rather than laboratory repairs.