Setting off a spark: National Science Week

From August 10-18, Australians across the country will be engaging in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics as part of National Science Week.

Launching the week, Minister for Industry, Science and Technology, Karen Andrews, highlighted how the focus of the week is on getting young people involved in science.

“When it comes to science, the next generation holds the keys to our economic future,” said Andrews.

The government’s approach to STEM education and engagement is not only at the tertiary or vocational education sector, but begins from early in life, according to Andrews.

“Sparking children’s interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects from an early age is at the forefront of the Morrison Government’s support for science,” said Andrews.

Rather than defining a set skill or competency, STEM training is about preparing young people for their jobs in the future, whatever form they may take.

“We know that many of the jobs of the future will require STEM skills and it’s crucial that students are studying it through primary and high school.

“STEM skills can be the launch-pad of many careers and we want to inspire all students to take up and stick with STEM subjects,” said Andrews.

Events are spread across the nation and in each state and territory, and range from exhibitions, to workshops, hackathons, and performances. Topics include archaeology and antiquity, human body and movement, energy and transport, environment and nature, health and medical, space and astronomy, and innovation and technology.

Minister for Education, Dan Tehan, highlighted how the Week cuts across all stages of learning.

“Our Government’s ongoing investment and focus on STEM education, from Early Learning STEM Australia in our preschools to the Curious Minds program for young women, is designed to ensure all students have access to the building blocks of learning that maths and science gives them,” said Tehan.