Thales Australia opens OneSKY office in Melbourne

Defence minister Christopher Pyne at the opening of the OneSKY office in Melbourne. Source: Twitter.

Thales Australia has officially opened its new World Trade Centre offices in Melbourne, which will be the base for its new OneSKY team developing the new Civil Military Air Traffic Management System for the Department of Defence and Airservices Australia.

The offices had undergone a $12 million redevelopment for the OneSKY project, which will eventually manage all civilian and military movements across approximately 11 per cent of the earth’s airspace, including Australia, New Zealand and into the Indian Ocean.

“This facility will be used to develop the most advanced and integrated air traffic control system in the world,” deputy prime minister Michael McCormack said.

“The system will manage forecasted growth of air traffic movement in Australia, by as much as 60 per cent by 2030, minimising delays for the travelling public.

“Under OneSKY, Australia will be better able to handle forecast air traffic growth which will reduce congestion and open up more efficient air routes to reduce flight times and fuel costs.”

OneSKY is being developed in a partnership between Thales Australia and Airservices Australia and the Department of Defence. The system will see air traffic controllers use advanced technology and real-time traffic prediction tools, as they guide aircraft and the flying public safely to their destinations.

Defence minister Christopher Pyne said that the Thales offices would support up to 550 specialist high-tech jobs in Melbourne across land and air traffic management businesses, with a further 200 jobs to be created in the Australian supply chain.

“In fact, around 75 per cent of the OneSKY acquisition cost and 95 per cent of the ongoing annual support costs will be to Australian companies,” Pyne said.

“This project will replace the ageing military air traffic management systems and is essential to ensuring our Defence Forces can continue to operate seamlessly in Australia’s airspace.”